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Prep for painting / stripping paint /painting questions
Topic Started: Apr 2 2017, 04:32 PM (562 Views)
fleetwoodbrougham
Compact
Hello all,

I think the greatest challenge for me in restoring model cars, an activity which I have been enjoying in recent years, has been properly removing paint from the car bodies. Some paints are very cooperative, and some are a right, well, you know . . . Corgi Juniors are a tough one, and some other enamels come to mind. I use environmentally friendly types of cleaners, which I presume are less effective than some of those nuclear option paint strippers.

I tried a more caustic type before, didn't find it that much more effective, and I didn't know how to dispose of the residue properly because the hazardous waste materials collection in my area leaves a lot to be desired.

What might some of you other strippers use?

A second question: I had a Corgi Rockets with the chrome style paint, and because it was too difficult to remove the paint, I primed over the original finish. I recently decided to paint that body with a rattle can, and found that spots would appear where the paint would just clear, leaving the gray primer exposed. Obviously some problem with the surface preparation, but is there a way to overcome it apart from stripping the original nasty finish away completely?
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Pixel
Subcompact
I was turned on to Pine Sol recently. The old school stuff with the massive pine scent strips paints from a lot of castings surprisingly well. I have even stripped old Lesney's this way. And disposal consists of running it through a sieve to get out the paint chunks, and dumping the rest down the toilet and flushing a few times.
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fleetwoodbrougham
Compact
Pixel
Apr 2 2017, 07:04 PM
I was turned on to Pine Sol recently. The old school stuff with the massive pine scent strips paints from a lot of castings surprisingly well. I have even stripped old Lesney's this way. And disposal consists of running it through a sieve to get out the paint chunks, and dumping the rest down the toilet and flushing a few times.
While I am still interested to learn other products and techniques, you, sir, are brilliant! Can't hurt to try that, and the pine fresh scent! Worst case scenario is it doesnt work and I end up mopping the kitchen floor. Great!
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funeralxempire
SUV
I like acetone for stripping, personally.
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craftymore
Member Avatar
Support your local demo derby.

It's been a while since I've done any actual customs but I always used Klean Sripp paint stripper. This is super strong stuff and you must wear heavy rubber gloves. It works quite well. Can be found at rural ag supply stores, hardware stores and possibly Wal-Mart. Make sure you buy the premium labled container. It's worth the extra few $.

Posted Image

It will literally make the paint bubble off the castings.
Posted Image
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fleetwoodbrougham
Compact
funeralxempire
Apr 2 2017, 07:39 PM
I like acetone for stripping, personally.
I have used that to remove tampos, but havent gone beyond that. What is your process entail, such as time and effort required?
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fleetwoodbrougham
Compact
craftymore
Apr 2 2017, 08:09 PM
It's been a while since I've done any actual customs but I always used Klean Sripp paint stripper. This is super strong stuff and you must wear heavy rubber gloves. It works quite well. Can be found at rural ag supply stores, hardware stores and possibly Wal-Mart. Make sure you buy the premium labled container. It's worth the extra few $.

Posted Image

It will literally make the paint bubble off the castings.
Posted Image
Looks like birthday cake decorations for a car loving four year old!
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funeralxempire
SUV
fleetwoodbrougham
Apr 2 2017, 08:15 PM
funeralxempire
Apr 2 2017, 07:39 PM
I like acetone for stripping, personally.
I have used that to remove tampos, but havent gone beyond that. What is your process entail, such as time and effort required?
I let the car soak for a few hours, come back and finish with a wire brush. Some colours come off much more easily than others though. I have heavy duty strippers sitting around for when acetone isn't enough, but I rarely need to use them.
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fleetwoodbrougham
Compact
Thanks, Funeralempire. Great to know there are alternatives to those nasty solvents at the hardware store, etc. even with gloves, it always turns out to be a mess.
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funeralxempire
SUV
fleetwoodbrougham
Apr 2 2017, 08:55 PM
Thanks, Funeralempire. Great to know there are alternatives to those nasty solvents at the hardware store, etc. even with gloves, it always turns out to be a mess.
Acetone isn't too harsh, I never wear gloves when working with it. I figure if folks can soak their fingers in it for minutes to loosen fake nails I shouldn't be too worried about a little getting on my skin. Just wash with soap and water afterwards. :thumbup:
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Hobie-wan
Member Avatar
SUV
Now I think about it, I've heard that letting stuff soak in (preferably warm) Simple Green might work.

I have been using the horrible aircraft stripper myself with gloves, a disposable pie pan, and some of those cheap metal tube brushes from Harbor Freight.
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Pixel
Subcompact
fleetwoodbrougham
Apr 2 2017, 07:27 PM
Pixel
Apr 2 2017, 07:04 PM
I was turned on to Pine Sol recently. The old school stuff with the massive pine scent strips paints from a lot of castings surprisingly well. I have even stripped old Lesney's this way. And disposal consists of running it through a sieve to get out the paint chunks, and dumping the rest down the toilet and flushing a few times.
While I am still interested to learn other products and techniques, you, sir, are brilliant! Can't hurt to try that, and the pine fresh scent! Worst case scenario is it doesnt work and I end up mopping the kitchen floor. Great!
Just be aware Pine-sol isn't fast, it can take a week to strip a car. I generally put a couple cars in a glass jar, fill it with pine-sol and leave it next to the kitchen sink. Every time I walk by I give it a quick shake. Sometimes you need to pull them out, give them a scrub to remove the loose paint and put them back in again. If I am in a hurry I use aircraft stripper, but the pine-sol has the advantage of trading slower speed for less nastiness.
Edited by Pixel, Apr 3 2017, 07:58 AM.
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fleetwoodbrougham
Compact
Aha, thanks Pixel....I'm in no hurry, so the lemony scent is just a blissful trade off. Update: Zylmex paint peelable after less tha 12 hours while an 80s Matchbox had some small scrabable areas. A good sign.

Purchased a bottle of nail polish remover to do my nails...uh, as back up for tougher duties or comparison purposes. I think pine sol or similar is even available in dollar tree. This is a best kept secret!!

I think it will probably be more thorough, pinesol or acetate as both are liquids rather than the pasty goo from some paint strippers, and these solvents can get into tiny crevices. I think it may be more uniform....we'll see.
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Milton Fox Racing
Member Avatar
SUV
I have had success with soaking stuff in Super Clean (Wal Marts and Auto Parts Stores) both for cleaning and stripping metal and plastics. Most paint comes off in 10 minutes to an hour or so. Some take overnight soaks. Tampos in less than 10 minutes.

It doesnt have an severe or lethal hazard warnings listed on the bottle. Just keep out of eyes and mouth and dont swallow of course.

I have left both plastic and metal soaking for up to 7 days without harm to the body. I dont know where the paint goes - it literally just goes away.


Posted Image[/QUOTE]
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fleetwoodbrougham
Compact
Milton Fox Racing
Apr 18 2017, 03:39 AM
I have had success with soaking stuff in Super Clean (Wal Marts and Auto Parts Stores) both for cleaning and stripping metal and plastics. Most paint comes off in 10 minutes to an hour or so. Some take overnight soaks. Tampos in less than 10 minutes.

It doesnt have an severe or lethal hazard warnings listed on the bottle. Just keep out of eyes and mouth and dont swallow of course.

I have left both plastic and metal soaking for up to 7 days without harm to the body. I dont know where the paint goes - it literally just goes away.


[/quote]That's great to know, M! Thank you! I'm going to try that!

Pinesol has been working very well, with the only difficult paints being a Matchbox 1979 Lincoln Continental Mark V (the red with white plastic top model), and an early 1990's HW Range Rover.

I've had really good success with every other car model. Because it is something that can be handled without gloves, and obviously be poured into the public water supply because it is used for cleaning, I feel comfortable with Pinesol (and probably this as well).

I looking through the Autozone body repair aisle, and saw the Aircraft stuff finally. It's great to know there are non-Industrial products at non-Industrial prices that'll do the trick!
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Milton Fox Racing
Member Avatar
SUV
I have a can of the Aircrat Paint Remover stuff and used it once or twice. It is fast! I also got a kick out of the warning - not to use on aircraft!

Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image
Edited by Milton Fox Racing, Apr 19 2017, 04:34 AM.
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FoolTrottel
Member Avatar
Fullsize
Milton Fox Racing
Apr 19 2017, 04:34 AM
I have a can of the Aircrat Paint Remover stuff and used it once or twice. It is fast! I also got a kick out of the warning - not to use on aircraft!

Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image
lol!
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Ripa
Member Avatar
Minivan
My choice is acetone too. I put it it a glass jar and leave the car in it overnight. Remember to close the jar properly not to let the acetone evaporate away.

After the car has bern in the jar long enough, I remove it from there with pliers. I wear disposable nitrile gloves and brush the paint off with a nylon wire brush. Everythibg doesn't need to come off immediately. After that I wash the body and whe it is dry I do a second brushing with a metal wire brush. I use fine softer type wire brush to get the rest out. The harder type (normal) brush will leave scuffs to the body.
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FoolTrottel
Member Avatar
Fullsize
Ripa
Apr 19 2017, 11:50 PM
My choice is acetone too. I put it it a glass jar and leave the car in it overnight. Remember to close the jar properly not to let the acetone evaporate away.

After the car has bern in the jar long enough, I remove it from there with pliers. I wear disposable nitrile gloves and brush the paint off with a nylon wire brush. Everythibg doesn't need to come off immediately. After that I wash the body and whe it is dry I do a second brushing with a metal wire brush. I use fine softer type wire brush to get the rest out. The harder type (normal) brush will leave scuffs to the body.
Just to add: I'd be using some safety goggles as well :) and make sure I was in a well ventilated room too.
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Ripa
Member Avatar
Minivan
FoolTrottel
Apr 20 2017, 10:12 AM
Ripa
Apr 19 2017, 11:50 PM
My choice is acetone too. I put it it a glass jar and leave the car in it overnight. Remember to close the jar properly not to let the acetone evaporate away.

After the car has bern in the jar long enough, I remove it from there with pliers. I wear disposable nitrile gloves and brush the paint off with a nylon wire brush. Everythibg doesn't need to come off immediately. After that I wash the body and whe it is dry I do a second brushing with a metal wire brush. I use fine softer type wire brush to get the rest out. The harder type (normal) brush will leave scuffs to the body.
Just to add: I'd be using some safety goggles as well :) and make sure I was in a well ventilated room too.
I wouldn't even think of doing this inside of the house. I do it always on the balcony with the door to my apartment shut
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Hot Wheels
Midsize
This is a timely thread since I have some car bodies I want to repaint. I may just try the Pine Sol method. :thumbup:
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funeralxempire
SUV
FoolTrottel
Apr 20 2017, 10:12 AM
Ripa
Apr 19 2017, 11:50 PM
My choice is acetone too. I put it it a glass jar and leave the car in it overnight. Remember to close the jar properly not to let the acetone evaporate away.

After the car has bern in the jar long enough, I remove it from there with pliers. I wear disposable nitrile gloves and brush the paint off with a nylon wire brush. Everythibg doesn't need to come off immediately. After that I wash the body and whe it is dry I do a second brushing with a metal wire brush. I use fine softer type wire brush to get the rest out. The harder type (normal) brush will leave scuffs to the body.
Just to add: I'd be using some safety goggles as well :) and make sure I was in a well ventilated room too.
You'd run the only nail salon in town that requires PPE. I do it in the bathroom without gloves or goggles, you know, just like when using it for it's intended purpose.
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